What Is Minimally Invasive Hip Surgery?

Traditional hip surgery involves one 10- to 12-inch incision with a 3- to 4-month recovery period. Over the past decade, however, minimally invasive techniques have been developed to successfully implant the very same clinically proven hip joints through a smaller incision without cutting the muscles and tendons around the hip.

Clinical experience shows that this procedure can allow a surgeon visibility and space to operate without cuts to the muscles. With less cutting of skin than in traditional surgery, and less or no cutting of key muscles and tissues, the goals of MIS are to alleviate pain, restore mobility, and get you back to your everyday activities sooner. MIS also keeps an important hip structure intact (the posterior capsule), which may help provide increased joint stability.

MIS Risk Statement:

Your results will depend on your personal circumstances. Not everyone is a candidate for minimally invasive hip replacement. Talk with your surgeon to determine if this procedure is the best option for you.

Your results will depend on your personal circumstances. And just like a natural hip, how well the materials in an artificial hip withstand the wear and tear that come with everyday use and rotation of the hip joint contributes to how long the artificial hip will last.

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To find a doctor near you, click the ‘find-a-doc’ link. For printed information on joint replacement, call 1-800-HIP-KNEE.
Talk to your surgeon about whether joint replacement or another treatment is right for you and the risks of the procedure, including the risk of implant wear, loosening or failure, and pain, swelling and infection. Zimmer Biomet does not practice medicine; only a surgeon can answer your questions regarding your individual symptoms, diagnosis and treatment.